Shibori Tank Top

Remember that shibori wrap top I made last year? In that post I already expressed my doubts about the combination of fabric and pattern I had chosen. The shibori dyed pattern seemed too busy to work with the folds in the wrap front. With the result that I only wore the top once. The fabric is a sumptuous Italian linen that I dyed myself so it had to be saved. As I’m on a mission to use my pattern and fabric stash, I choose Grainlines Tiny Pocket Tank to transform the wrap top into something I’d wear.

DIY Couture Wrap Top

I had to cut up the pattern to make it fit out of the wrap top pieces. I unpicked the whole top to have as much fabric as possible (that one time you’re sorry you flat felled and finished all the seams), as the tiny pocket tank is kind of a wide swing top. I cut the front of the tank out of the back, but I had to move the shoulder seams to the front. This is easily done by cutting off the front straps where you want and attaching them to the back piece straps. Overlap to get rid of the seam allowance and add a new seam allowance to the strap, and that’s it. I cut the back out of the two wrap front pieces, which meant I had to create a center back seam. It was also too long, so I cut a yoke.

Shibori Tank Top
Shibori Tank Top

I had some trouble with getting the bust darts right. In my head I am still a B-cup so it should fit me fine. In reality I am only a B-cup when wearing a padded bra which I rarely do these days. I am wearing one in these photo’s. I should have done a Small Bust Adjustment on the pattern, but I only thought of this after I cut the pieces out.

There’s also a small split hem going on as you can see, an unintended result of messing with the bust darts. I had sewn them smaller and then hemmed the shirt, in a kind of “lets ignore this problem and just get on with it”- mood. Then I took a break and when I came back decided I really had to improve/enlarge the darts, resulting in a shorter front than back. A split hem seemed the best the solution for this as I didn’t want to shorten the back, too.

Shibori Tank Top

Some other adjustments I made were curving the waist seams a bit, making the top somewhat tighter around the bust. I also added some length in the straps because as I have experienced with my Archer Shirt, these patterns are short on me. As are nearly all patterns. This lengthening lowered the neckline simultaneously, but because it’s quite snug at the high bust there’s no gaping when I move or bend over. I also curved the center back seam at the lower back, it was standing out a bit too much for my taste.

I’m really pleased with how it turned out, I’m so glad I managed to refashion the wrap top and get a good pattern placement. I’m wearing it with my mini Jade skirt, a pairing I really like to my surprise. As Gillian rightfully pointed out I don’t usually wear the Jade without tights, but I love this combination in colour and shape. She has dared me to make another one, and I’m thinking of doing one in a stretch woven, one I’ll wear in the summer. There might be denim and bleach involved too, but more on that later!

6 Comments

  1. Gillian

    : Reply to Gillian

    In my books, this counts as a sewing dare completed, right? “Your dare: make a new jade skirt, or a top to go with one you’ve made!” I love your shibori top – there’s something so satisfying about refashioning something and giving it new life!
    And oh my, the scenery… wow!

    • Lisa Kievits

      :

      Ha, you’re right! The scenery is something we enjoy every day, green hills and forest everywhere you look.

  2. Debbie

    : Reply to Debbie

    Lovely! And I’m a big fan of cutting up something unworn to make something new, even if that first thing (ie your wrap top) was utterly gorgeous in the first place. I’ve done this more times than I can count, and am always so much more pleased to get more wear out of the garment. Great save!

    • Lisa Kievits

      :

      Thanks Debbie! It’s hard to do with me mades sometimes since you’ve already put so much time in it, but with a great fabric it’s definitely worth it!

    • Lisa Kievits

      :

      Ha, the perfect refashion pattern, then!

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